Disabilities Services

Our Mission

The Johnson University Office of Disability Services coordinates and supports students with a documented disability.  In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, and the amended ADA of 2011, Johnson University ensure that students with disabilities have equal access to educational opportunities.  In accordance with these laws, no qualified individual shall unlawfully be denied access to or participation in any services, programs, or activities of Johnson University on the basis of his or her disability.  These laws require institutions of higher learning to provide reasonable accommodations for the needs of qualified students as they pursue post-secondary education.

Definition of Disability

A disability is a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities of the individual.

  1. Major Life Activities: The phrase major life activities refers to normal functions such as caring for one’s self, performing manual tasks, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning, and working.
  2. Physical Impairment: A physical impairment includes any physiological disorder or condition, cosmetic disfigurement, or anatomical loss affecting one or more of the following body systems: neurological, musculoskeletal, special sense organs, respiratory and speech organs, cardiovascular, reproductive, digestive, genitourinary, hemic and lymphatic, skin and endocrine.
  3. Mental Impairment: A mental impairment includes any mental or psychological disorder such as organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, and specific learning disabilities.
  4. Learning disabilities:  A learning disability is a generic term that refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders manifested by significant difficulties in the acquisition and use of listening, speaking, reading, writing, reasoning, or mathematical abilities.  These disorders occur in persons of average to very superior intelligence and are presumed to be due to central nervous system dysfunction.

Specific disabilities include, but are not limited to, the following: blindness or visual impairment; chronic illnesses; psychiatric and emotional disabilities (ADHD, anxiety and related disorders, depression, etc.); deafness or hearing impairments; epilepsy or seizure disorders; orthopedic impairment; specific learning disability; speech disorder; spinal cord or traumatic brain injury; and neurological and neuro-muscular disorders.

If you are experiencing difficulties with one or more of these activities, or if you are experiencing educational difficulties due to a possible disability, please consider contacting our office to meet with someone to discuss options.

Helpful Links

Academic Support Center            Library              Counseling Center